See the island of Manhattan at the time of Henry Hudson's arrival—a fresh, green new world at the moment of discovery.

When Henry Hudson and a small crew of Dutch and English sailors rode the flood tide up a great estuarine river on the North American continent on September 12, 1609, they were looking for a passage to Oriental riches. Instead, they found a cornucopia of natural wealth—old growth forests, stately wetlands, rolling hills, and abundant wildlife. The local people called the island "Mannahatta," which may have meant "island of many hills." It would become as densely filled with people and avenues as it once teemed with trees and streams. Through cutting edge multi-media and historical artifacts and maps, Mannahatta/Manhattan: A Natural History of New York City reveals the island of Mannahatta as a green new world at the time of Hudson's arrival, presenting a fresh and vivid view of New York’s ecological origins.

Mannahatta/Manhattan: A Natural History of New York City is presented in collaboration with the Wildlife Conservation Society. For more information, visit the Mannahatta Project website.